$0.00 0

Shopping Cart

0
No products in the cart.

Call us at 877-456-5049

$0.00 0

Shopping Cart

0
No products in the cart.

Sol, the Southern Sea Otter

These otters live in forests of giant kelp, have the thickest fur of any mammal, and are one of the few animals that use tools, like a stone, so they can break open shells.

Home: Channel Islands National Park, Golden Gate National Recreation Area (CA)

Population: A few thousand

Why we need them: Keystone Species

Major Threats: Human Disturbances

Fun Fact: They are also a keystone species. They live in forests of giant kelp off the coast and play a crucial role in maintaining that habitat for many marine animals

Sol, the Southern Sea Otter

These otters live in forests of giant kelp, have the thickest fur of any mammal, and are one of the few animals that use tools, like a stone, so they can break open shells.

Home: Channel Islands National Park, Golden Gate National Recreation Area (CA)

Population: A few thousand

Why we need them: Keystone Species

Major Threats: Human Disturbances

Fun Fact: They are also a keystone species. They live in forests of giant kelp off the coast and play a crucial role in maintaining that habitat for many marine animals

Loosi, the Black-Footed Ferret

These ferrets were once extinct. That’s right, we thought all of the black-footed ferrets were gone until they were re-discovered in 1981.

Home: Badlands National Park,
Wind Cave National Park (SD)

Population: A few hundred

Why we need them: Their survival tells us about the health of the grassland ecosystem

Major Threats: Disease, Predators

Fun Fact: 90% of their diet is prairie dogs.

Ben, the Sonoran Pronghorn

They once roamed the southwestern United States, but when people put up fences and roads, he could not travel to find food and water. They are nicknamed The Desert Ghost because of their elusive nature.

Home: Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (AZ)

Population: A few hundred

Why we need them:Their survival tells us about the health of the desert ecosystem

Major Threats: Roads, Fences, Climate Change

Fun Fact: Fastest land mammal in North America.

Ben, the Sonoran Pronghorn

They once roamed the southwestern United States, but when people put up fences and roads, he could not travel to find food and water. They are nicknamed The Desert Ghost because of their elusive nature.

Home: Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (AZ)

Population: A few hundred

Why we need them:Their survival tells us about the health of the desert ecosystem

Major Threats: Roads, Fences, Climate Change

Fun Fact: Fastest land mammal in North America.

Brody, the Hawaiian Hoary Bat

10,000 years ago this bat landed in the Hawaiian Islands. These bats don’t dwell in caves but they roost in trees. The main threats to the Hawaiian hoary bat are the destruction of habitat and collisions with man-made structures.

Home: Haleakalā National Park, Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park (HI)

Population: Unknown

Why we need them: They eat pests

Major Threats: Pesticides and Habitat Loss

Fun Fact: They are the only land mammal native to Hawaii.

 

 

 

 Facts about animals and parks were sourced from the National Park Service (nps.gov).